The World of Paul's Mind by Patrick Henry Reardon

As It Is Written . . .

The World of Paul's Mind

by Patrick Henry Reardon

Theology should be personal—even biographical—in the sense that a man's reflection on the things of God is preferably of a piece with the rest of his life. Obviously, this attribute is easiest to trace in those theologians whose writings include correspondence or other autobiographical elements. One thinks of Justin, Basil, and particularly Augustine, and, in more recent times, Bonhoeffer and Schmemann.

The earliest models of this feature of theology, I suppose, were those eighth-century b.c. prophets whose messages were explicit . . .