In the first of these miracles, the curing of the leper, the Lord invokes the authority of Moses (8:4), and in the second he extends the blessing of the Chosen People to the faith of the Gentiles (8:11).

Matthew 7:29 introduced the theme of the Lord's "authority" (exsousia), which appears here again in 8:9. It will reappear presently in the matter of the forgiveness of sins (9:6), where we will learn that this authority is shared with the Church (9:8).

Hebrews 10.11-18: The Old Testament sacrifices were many, whereas the New Testament sacrifice is unique: "And every priest stands ministering daily and offering repeatedly the same sacrifices . . . But this Man, after He had offered one sacrifice for sins forever, sat down at the right hand of God." In the previous chapter we read that "Christ was offered once to bear the sins of many" (9:28). This word "once" (hapachs) is found in Hebrews 8 times, more than all the other New Testament books put together.

This hapachs, "once," is contrasted with pollakis, "many times" (9:25-26).

The Old Testament sacrifices were unable, of themselves, to atone for sins and purify the heart: "And every priest stands ministering daily and offering repeatedly the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins, and "by one offering He has perfected forever those who are being sanctified."

Implied in the development of this theme is an underlying judgment on the Jewish religion itself: Now that the fulfillment of its history has come in Christ and His redeeming work, the Jewish religion no longer represents God's will for history. This is why it is called "the old covenant: "In that He says, 'A new covenant,' He has made the first obsolete. Now what is becoming obsolete and growing old is ready to vanish away" (8:13). The continued existence of a "Jewish religion" alongside the Christian Gospel remains an anomaly yet to be resolved.