The Pains of Nineveh by Anne Barbeau Gardiner

Review

The Pains of Nineveh

Year of the Sword: The Assyrian Christian Genocide, A History
by Joseph Yacoub, tr. James Ferguson
Oxford University Press, 2016
(295 pages, $29.95, hardcover)

reviewed by Anne Barbeau Gardiner

After World War II, the Assyrian genocide of 1915 fell into oblivion, although ten years earlier, in 1935, the League of Nations had declared, “It is probable that there is no human community in relative terms that has suffered trials and blows comparable to those endured by that small group, both Nation and Church, that bears the name of Assyrian.” Indeed, nearly half the population of this people was exterminated about a century ago.


This article is only available to subscribers.

Login to Touchstone Online

Not a subscriber? Subscribe to Touchstone today for full online access. Over 30 years of content!
Options Below:

personal subscriptions

Purchase
Online Subscription

Get a one-year full-access subscription to the Touchstone online archives including pdf downloads for only $19.95. That's only $1.66 per month!

Purchase Print &
Online Subscription

Get six issues (one year) of Touchstone PLUS full online access including pdf downloads for only $39.95. That's only $3.34 per month!


Options for foreign subscribers

Transactions will be processed on the secure server of The Fellowship of St. James website, the publisher of Touchstone.

kindle subscription

OR get a subscription to Touchstone to read on your Kindle for only $1.99 per month! (This option is KINDLE ONLY and does not include either print or online.)

Your subscription goes a long way to ensure that Touchstone is able to continue its mission of publishing quality Christian articles and commentary.


more on martyrdom from the online archives


more from the online archives

22.4—May 2009

Take & Give

on Two Words That Describe the Workings of Love by Bruce Brander

29.3—May/June 2016

Health of the Nation

A Deathbed Reflection on Catholic Social Teaching & Our Future Prospects by Karl D. Stephan

28.2—March/April 2015

The Icon of Materialism

Why Scientism's Cherished Progress Narrative Fails by Jonathan Witt