Born One of Us by Patrick Henry Reardon

AS IT IS WRITTEN by Patrick Henry Reardon

Born One of Us

Even as we insist that the eternal Word assumed the concrete circumstances of an individual human life—becoming a subjective participant in human history—the redemptive significance of the Incarnation is rooted, not in the individuality of Jesus’ life, but in the general and common humanity he shares with the rest of us.

Indeed, in the New Testament one finds no impulse to treat Jesus as an “exceptional” man, as the world understands such a one: a heroic figure who rises above his contemporaries to answer the call of destiny. Such a man is different from other men.

Jesus is treated, rather, as one of us. This treatment is very different from the way t . . .